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Don’t Be Ashamed of Your Quarantine 15 – The New York Times

Aug, 11th 2020 4:47 pm, Article Recommended by Dr. J. Smith

With the explosion of lockdown-friendly home exercise programs and advice, it may seem as if its never been easier to work out at home. But the reality is, its probably never been harder. For every person posting a sweaty crushed it selfie on Instagram, theres another one (or four) just trying to endure pandemic-induced stress. Add in constant access to the refrigerator and a pantry overstocked with panic buys, and the guilt about what weve eaten or the exercise we havent done piles on faster than you can say Quarantine 15.

So youve gained weight, said Elyse Resch, a nutrition therapist. So what? Youre alive. Were doing the best we can with the resources we have. (Not to mention many others straining under severe challenges, like significant health concerns and financial worries.)

You, too, can shrug off minor or moderate weight gain or the loss of your pre-pandemic fitness level. Read on.

Above all, have compassion. I dont think most people change their minds by being yelled at or punched in the face, but thats how we talk to ourselves, said Phoenix Jackson, a clinical psychologist who specializes in trauma. When Ms. Jackson is having trouble speaking to herself as kindly as she might a beloved friend, she likes to find a photo of herself as a child and think of how gently shed like that person to be spoken to.

Next, recognize that weight and ambitious exercise regimens may offer the illusion of control in a world that seems out of control, but the anxiety they produce is not helpful. This is part of a larger problem: Most of us feel pressure to achieve or maintain a certain body size because weve been taught that its important. Excess weight has been linked to considerable health risks, though it does not, by definition, mean a person is unhealthy. Unfortunately, fatphobia promotes just the opposite: Fat people are denied health care, earn less money at work and have a harder time finding work in the first place, research has shown.

Break the cycle by asking yourself where you learned that weight gain was something to be ashamed of, Paula Freedman, a clinical psychologist who specializes in eating disorders, wrote in an email. Ask: Does this belief help me be the type of person I want to be? (Dr. Freedman added that you may have to break this down further: What type of person do I want to be? How do I want to treat myself and other people?)

Christy Harrison, a nutrition therapist who examined the issue of excess weight and the virus in a Wired article published in April, said in an interview last month that few of the early research studies on the matter controlled for race, socioeconomic status or quality of care social determinants of health that we know explain the lions share of health disparities between groups of people, she wrote. Nor did they control for how doctors biases influence the way they care for higher-weight patients. But strong evidence exists that obesity (defined as having a body mass index of 30 or higher) puts you at greater risk of dying from Covid-19.

At the end of the day, regardless of what the science does or doesnt say about Covid and weight, we still dont have any way for people to lose weight and keep it off, Ms. Harrison said.

She suggested asking yourself: What am I getting out of worrying about food and my body right now, and what am I losing? What could I be doing with that time and energy? One survey suggested women fretted for 21 minutes a day and men for 18 minutes a day. (And to some people, that number may sound awfully low.) Still, thats a lot of time that could be devoted to anything from guilty pleasures to relationships or to life- and world-changing causes.

Fearing weight gain and feeling bad about your body takes you away from what really matters and being able to participate in this cultural moment, Ms. Harrison said.

One tenet of diet culture or wellness culture, which is really just the rebranding of diet culture is that eating for any other reason besides screaming biological hunger is a bad thing. This belief came from the rise ofdiet clubs in the 1960s, where women went to talk out their feelings so they could avoid so-called emotional eating.

You have to be starving to deserve to eat in this culture, Ms. Harrison said. But we are designed to get pleasure out of food and connect over food.

Lets say food really is giving you comfort. Go with it, love it, be grateful for it, Ms. Resch said. With one caveat: Youll need to stay present to get the actual comfort and satisfaction. If youre too busy judging yourself when you eat, youre not savoring the texture and flavor.

So youre not working out enough, or as hard as you did pre-lockdown, and you think this is a problem. This may be because, for you, exercise is about controlling your body or compensating for what youve been eating yet another belief to be discarded.

Exercise is its own pleasurable thing you can do for joy and for mental health benefits, Ms. Harrison said. Its hard to tune into that when you have all these voices in your head saying, But if I cant get my heart rate to this Im not going to get the benefits.

Ms. Resch prefers the word movement to exercise.

Exercise connotes something you have to do, she said. You want to take out the sense of doing it for a purpose like weight loss or keeping muscle on. Instead, ask yourself what makes you feel good in your body. It could just be standing up and stretching.

Channel your energy into something more productive than obsessing about weight and exercise like working to change diet culture, such as calling out thin-promoting or fat-shaming comments on your social networks. Suman Ambwani, an associate professor of psychology at Dickinson College, said people are sometimes reluctant to challenge these sorts of statements. But we found in one study a couple of years ago that someone who called attention to this issue and rejected appearance-related self-worth and the thin ideal was actually seen as more likable than someone who just colluded with body-shaming, she said.

Dr. Ambwani suggested following the health-at-every-size movement a nearly 20-year-old movement that promotes weight inclusivity and social justice to educate yourself, and then looking for ways to get involved. If you live in Massachusetts, for example, you could write to lawmakers in support of a bill underway to make weight discrimination illegal.

Finally, look at feeling bad as the canary in the coal mine the indicator that something might be ready to change, said Elizabeth Hall, an intuitive eating coach in Farmington, Conn. Although people often respond by vowing to buckle down or work harder, she said, the way to end the guilt and shame is actually just to notice those feelings, and to ask yourself if they are serving you or causing suffering.

Feeling bad is actually an invitation to expand and shift our consciousness and let go of expectations and old programming, she said.

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Don't Be Ashamed of Your Quarantine 15 - The New York Times

I Tried Paleo And The Whole30 Diet And Lost 120 Pounds After My Pregnancy – Women’s Health

Aug, 11th 2020 4:47 pm, Article Recommended by Dr. J. Smith

Caitlin/@thekindredginger

I'm Caitlin L. (@thekindredginger), 36. I live in Northern California and am a mom. After giving birth to my daughter in 2014, I struggled with my post-pregnancy weight loss. At 260 pounds, I decided to make some major lifestyle changes and try the paleo and Whole30 diets. It was a marathon getting here, but I've lost 120 pounds and *never* felt better.

In December of 2014, I weighed around 260 pounds after my pregnancy. I thought shaking the baby weight would be easythat maybe, at least some of it, would just melt away. But instead, my weight was constantly yo-yoing. I knew I was worthy of more when it came to my mental and physical health.

At around six months postpartum, I got realistic and decided to come up with a plan of major lifestyle changes that would help me lose weight for good. I was determined this time. I owed it to my daughter to show her what a strong and healthy woman looked and acted like.

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After years of attempting diets and fasting, then failing and gaining back weight Id lost, I knew I needed to find a healthy way of eating to last a lifetime.

I began by eating paleo and had success with that. I was able to maintain eating that way most of the time for about a year, ultimately losing 110 pounds. Then I switched to the Whole30 dietand doing it changed my life.

While doing Whole30, I discovered food intolerances I didnt know existed, I learned how to cook with foods and ingredients that were delicious and ultra-nutritious, and I had so many other non-scale victories. I also lost 10 more pounds, making my weight loss a total of 120 pounds in two years.

Most days, I eat three meals a day that are comprised of half a plate of non-starchy (mostly green) vegetables, a quarter plate of potatoes, and quarter plate of protein. All I have to do is swap out the proteins.

Sometimes I add in bit of fat to my meals in the form of dressings, oils, and sauces. But my motto is: everything in moderation. So when the opportunity comes up for a pizza or burger and fries, I eat it and enjoy it! But I don't indulge all the time, and I make it worth it when I do.

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The issue was, I did little physical activity during my pregnancy, and it was hard to get back into it after giving birth. So once I committed to getting healthy, I began by just walking for weight loss. My goal was to make one change at a time and to maintain it for set period. I knew that if I changed too much at one time, the stress and pressure to maintain it all would be overwhelming.

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So I started by walking three times a week and had a goal to maintain that for one month. By the end of the month I had added two additional days. From there I continued to add in body weight exercising and eventually shifted to weight training and running.

Now, I workout four or five times a week with a blend of running, HITT, and weightlifting. My workouts are about an hour long. On average, I burn about 600 calories.

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Starting with the fact that maintaining weight loss is a lifelong journey of staying healthy and not a sprint. It takes discipline and hard work. And once you've lost the weight, the journey continues with a mix of balance, lots of self-care, grace, and motivation.

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Plus, a change in mindset helps too. My tip? Focus on being strong and capable. When I shifted my mindset away from the scale and from being "skinny" to being strong and capable, my outlook on weight loss shifted from achieving a certain appearance to achieving something so much more. Every workout and every meal contributes to a greater sense of empowerment and confidence when the end goal is to feel strong and capable of any challenge you're faced with.

Eat to nourish your body 90 percent of the time and for pleasure 10 percent of the time. Try to move around most of the day and when you workout, work out as hard as you can. Know youre capable of so much more than you think, and you are worthy of feeling your best self. That may take some time and it may feel impossible at time, but trust me, its worth it!

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I Tried Paleo And The Whole30 Diet And Lost 120 Pounds After My Pregnancy - Women's Health

Go Plant-Based to Lose Weight, Lower Blood Sugar & Avoid Diabetes – The Beet

Aug, 11th 2020 4:47 pm, Article Recommended by Dr. J. Smith

A new study just published finds that plant-based dietshelp you metabolizeglucose, lose weight (especially in overweight people) and avoid type 2 diabetes. The study, from the University of Bergen in Norway, looked at different plant-based diets and found that in light of the rising prevalence of obesity and metabolic disorders that are related to impaired glucose metabolism, an effective strategy to delay or prevent disease is to go plant-based.

"A plant-based diet has been suggested as an effective lifestyle change that may reduce the degree of obesity and improve outcomes related to glucose metabolism," the study found. "This systematic review aimed to evaluate the effect of a plant-based diet on outcomes related to glucose metabolism."

The study aimed to evaluate the effect of a plant-based diet on outcomes related to glucose metabolism which effects weight, body fat, BMI and risk for metabolic disorders and diabetes.

The authors compared plant-based diets to an omnivorous diet and reviewed nine trials on subjects who were identified as overweight, or obese, had type 2 diabetes or cardiovascular disease. Five studies reported that the plant-based intervention significantly improved markers of glycemic control and four of the trials revealed a "significant improvement" in the intervention group given a plant-based diet, compared to the control group. The remaining four studies did not observe a significant effect.

The findings suggest that a shift to a plant-based diet has favorable effects on glycemic control in individuals diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or obesity. Overall, no clear conclusions regarding the effects of different plant-based diets can be drawn based on the current findings alone.

This is only the most recent study to show that a plant-based diet has beneficial effects on weight, diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Another recent study found that eating more plant-based foods, even just one more serving of fruits and vegetables a day, had a beneficial effect on your risk of becoming overweight or getting diabetes. And still another recent review found that those who ate the most meat in theirdietsraised their risk of diabetes by 33 percent. Still another study from last February showed that a strict whole food plant-based diet can reverse symptoms of diabetes.

Eating plant-based can lead to optimal health and weight. For the easiest way to lose weight on a plant-based diet, try The Beet's own VegStart Diet, which provides 14 days of meals, snacks and expert tips to stay on track to lose the healthy way.

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Go Plant-Based to Lose Weight, Lower Blood Sugar & Avoid Diabetes - The Beet

From McDonalds to KFC, the fast food you can eat and lose weight according to no-nonsense fitness guru – The Sun

Aug, 11th 2020 4:47 pm, Article Recommended by Dr. J. Smith

WHEN it comes to dieting, most of us picture a bowl of salad or long hours of fasting before the next mealtime.

But if you're someone who struggles to lose weight because you can't say no to a Big Mac and fries then fear not.

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A diet and fitness expert claims that you can still eat your favourite fast food and watch the pounds melt away.

Graeme Tomlinson, AKA The Fitness Chef on Instagram, is known for his no-nonsense nutritional advice and myth busting posts.

He says meals from the likes of McDonald's, KFC and Burger King are to be enjoyed.

But the key to doing that, he says, is eating in moderation - as well as supporting your diet with other foods rich in nutrients.

In a recent Instagram post, he revealed the calories of some of Britain's best loved fast food dishes - and the odd sweet treat.

The simple infographics help compare the difference between portion sizes, such as a small fries vs large, so dieters can easily recognise how many calories they are consuming.

Writing under the post, Graeme said: "This assortment of slides is not an endorsement of fast food as much as it is not a shaming of it as a food choice.

"Instead, it is simply a selection of food from some of the worlds favourite fast food chains.

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"This post is therefore an objective arrangement of basic nutritional information."

He added: "The establishments included in this post have existed for decades.

"This is undoubtedly because it is abundantly clear that millions continue to enjoy consumption of such food.

Whilst most items within these lists are not particularly nutrient dense, they are still legitimate items of food which should be eaten if enjoyed.

"And whilst most items within these lists are not particularly nutrient dense, they are still legitimate items of food which should be eaten if enjoyed.

"Instead of basing opinion on subjective metaphors and closed minded assumptions that fast food will send us to hospital, it is more useful to consider a more logical approach.

"Correlation of consumption in relation to regularity and overall dietary intake is a more worthwhile way to gauge the effect of fast food on ones overall health."

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He also pointed to a "mass hysteria" around fast food during the early 2000s, when there were warnings about the negative effect on health.

Graeme added: "One example can be found in the Supersize Me experiment/documentary in 2004.

"It professed the negative impact McDonalds had on the subjects health.

"But the subject consumed nothing but McDonalds food for one whole month.

"Whilst the findings may have been accurate, they are rendered as entirely useless to those who do not consume 90+ McDonalds meals per month.

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"Thus, we can estimate that the findings from Supersize Me are irrelevant."

He continued:" For optimal health, excessive consumption of fast food is not going to be particularly beneficial.

"But if consumption is moderate and accompanied by an overall supportive dietary process rich in nutrients, it can have an enjoyed position in ones life now and again."

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From McDonalds to KFC, the fast food you can eat and lose weight according to no-nonsense fitness guru - The Sun

Watch Doctor Mike Fact-Check the Most Popular Weight Loss Tips on the Internet – Men’s Health

Aug, 11th 2020 4:47 pm, Article Recommended by Dr. J. Smith

Doctor Mike has tried out all kinds of popular diets and nutrition plans on his YouTube channel, including going keto and adopting a plant-based diet. For his newest video, he decided to do a deep dive into all of the advice that's out there regarding the best, fastest or most effective ways to lose weight, and subjected these pearls of wisdom to fact-checking. Here are his responses to some of the most erroneous and outrageous claims.

"Caffeine is a stimulant, so it could potentially boost your metabolism," says Mike, acknowledging that black coffee specifically doesn't have excess calories from sugar, cream etc. Additionally, black coffee can be consumed while intermittent fasting. "You're still going to be getting those same benefits, with a little stimulation."

"If you want to hang a mirror in front of your dining table because of decor, please go right ahead," says Mike. "If you're doing it so you'll hate yourself while you're eating, no!"

"I like this tip, I think it's a fairly benign tip," says Mike, who has identified portion size as a recurring problem in the eating habits of his overweight patients. A smaller plate immediately helps to reduce that amount of food, and he agrees that there is a psychological component to seeing a clean plate and feeling full. "

"I am hesitant to recommend this one," says Mike. "I feel like you can find nutrient-rich protein sources like salmon and tuna, and in addition to the protein, you're also going to get a lot other nutrients that aren't in protein powder, like omega 3 fatty acids."

Mike amends this advice slightly to "chew thoroughly", but sees the value in not eating too quickly, and giving the body time to react to your food intake. "It's really about eating to the point where you're satiated," he says.

The theory here is that the catechins in green tea work in concert with caffeine to burn fat. However, Mike warns, "It's not going to be a magical effect that you see here."

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"You can lose weight without necessarily ever feeling hungry and suffering with it," says Mike, who recommends intuitive eating, where you only eat to the point that you feel satiated, but not overly full. "That way, you're not overeating calories, you're not having these tremendous portions, and you don't have to starve yourself."

"This one has been pretty much debunked by modern science," says Mike.

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Watch Doctor Mike Fact-Check the Most Popular Weight Loss Tips on the Internet - Men's Health

Community Riders find the wheel to form bonds, stay fit – The Advocate

Aug, 11th 2020 4:47 pm, Article Recommended by Dr. J. Smith

In a year full of pandemic pressures and social unrest, a coalition of Zachary neighbors found new connections, shared fitness goals, and a way to socialize safely while on the move. They are the Zachary Community Riders and thats how they roll.

The Zachary Community Riders come from different walks of life, represent all ages groups and are racially diverse. The love of hitting the road on a bike and meeting new friends is the glue keeping them together and growing.

The group met Saturday at LSU Lakes after two rides in the week that left from the Zachary Community Park. After Saturdays ride, the Community Riders had logged more than 100 miles in the month of August.

Founder Serrita Givens was on a personal mission long before the pandemic turned attention to health concerns. Her wake-up call came in the fall of 2018. I was 320 pounds in September of 2018 and I knew I had to lose weight it was hard to breath and exercise, I was lazy, and just the extra weight was holding me down, she said. So, one day I just decided that I had to get fit.

Givens turned to social media to help find other people to exercise with her and support each other. She found a community of mothers and women interested in walking. The slogan Get Fit with Ree became a battle cry for Givens and a newfound group of supporters.

The group expanded its reach and methods in early summer. Bike riding was added to change the exercise pace and attract more people and families looking for ways to get out, get exercise, and safely practice social distancing under the sky instead of confined under a roof. I just kept the name attached it to the Community Riders because we're still getting Fit with Ree, but we're just doing it another way, Givens said.

Heather Steinberger has only been in Zachary for four years so she could relate to the need meet new friends while also on a similar weight-loss journey. She moved from San Antonio, Texas, and will often ride with her three children making the Community Riders a family affair as well as a way to pursue health goals. I had to drop some pounds and I set a weight loss goal is 100 pounds, she said. I've already dropped 40 since last year just by diet alone. Now I'm working in the exercise part of it.

Richard Wilkinson is a lifelong resident of Zachary, but he had a need to do something different and connect when he started riding with the group a month ago. I was riding to meet people and to get out the house, he said. Now I can't stop; I gotta go ride.

Kathy Hale and Kelli Harrison are new to Zachary, but not to each other. The Hale and Harrison families moved to Zachary from Vermont a year ago. Both of their husbands relocated to work at the River Bend Nuclear Power Station. Their families have a strong connection to each other, and they sought to develop ties in their new community.

Moving here and only knowing Kelli in this entire state, I wanted to join something, Hale said. And I had been a part of a group for over 12 years and I thought about starting another book group, and then the pandemic and I realized that wasn't probably going to happen.

Hale worked as a recreation therapist for more than 35 years, so she had a strong desire to find some physically active and outdoors. She hadnt formed ties with anyone on her street and saw the Get Fit with Ree social media post. I reached out to her because she wanted to start a multiracial, multigenerational group, and I was all up for that, Hale said. So, it was a win-win to know that all these great people and we're doing our part to find common bonds as we get to know everybody, and its a wonderful thing.

Givens has connected her family with other families in the riding group. Her son, Darryl, is a linebacker on the Zachary High Football team and he joined his mother Saturday to loosen up his legs and work on endurance. Givens brother, Jason, is a teacher and health enthusiast. He adds advice on bike routes while supporting his sisters health and fitness goals.

The group got a boost in support after the development of the Community Unity Project in Zachary. The social justice organization has held marches, forums and community discussions as national attention was sparked following the death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police. The two groups seem to have different missions, but they shared a need to bring people in the community together and develop both relationships and alliance. CUPs core leaders are young, so many participate in both sets of activities.

The riders meet three days a week Tuesdays and Thursdays evenings at the Zachary Community Park on Scenic Highway and they take the show on the road to different routes on Saturday mornings. For more information or to connect, look for Zachary Community Riders on Facebook.

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Community Riders find the wheel to form bonds, stay fit - The Advocate

New York Bariatric Group Reduces the Risk of Severe COVID-19 Outcomes in Overweight and Obese Patients – PRNewswire

Aug, 11th 2020 4:47 pm, Article Recommended by Dr. J. Smith

ROSLYN HEIGHTS, N.Y., Aug. 11, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- Preliminary studies have surfaced that being overweight or obese have been shown to increase the severity and rate of mortality in individuals with COVID-19. New York Bariatric Group started seeing an influx of patients seeking out options to get to a healthier weight following the COVID outbreak. The options available at New York Bariatric Group for rapid and successful long-term weight loss is a solution for obesity and provides a viable option for those seeking to reduce the health risks associated with contracting COVID-19.

Obese patients are more likely to be hospitalized for COVID-19, more likely to be admitted to the ICU, intubated and progress into higher mortality rates. COVID-19 hospitalization shows the strongest association with obesity patients having direct effect on pulmonary function with decreased lung volume and weaker respiratory muscles. Obesity also shows a pro-inflammatory response to COVID-19, resulting in more severe immune response to the disease. Obesity is associated with diabetes, heart disease and kidney disease, all of which increases the risk of developing pneumonia.

Medical professionals are predicting a persistance of the COVID-19 pandemic through the fall or perhaps even a second wave. Given the uncertain trajectory of COVID, the need to lose weight takes on greater urgency. At New York Bariatric Group, we have developed a rapid, one day workup that allows patients to complete all required clearances in one day. This compressed workup allows patients to have their weight loss surgery as soon as 4 weeks from the initial consultation.

New York Bariatric Group combats obesity with a number of different surgical and non-surgical weight loss options. The weight loss option utilized on patients is tailored to an individual's medical history. Consultation with a bariatric surgeon will determine which procedure is ideal for the desired weight loss.

New York Bariatric Group New York Bariatric Group is widely known as the preeminent bariatric practice in New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut. The NYBG team of fifteen of the industry's top bariatric surgeons has performed over 18,000 successful procedures, a number which is growing each day. Utilizing technology, talent, and experience, they form an elite institution for the treatment of obesity.

For more information or to schedule an appointment, call 800-633-8446 or visit stopobesityforlife.com

Press Contact:

Megan DiGregorio

Director of Marketing and Business Development

Email: [emailprotected]

SOURCE New York Bariatric Group

https://bariatric.stopobesityforlife.com

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New York Bariatric Group Reduces the Risk of Severe COVID-19 Outcomes in Overweight and Obese Patients - PRNewswire

Meat alternatives and food subsidies could help ‘millions of people lose weight’ – Sky News

Aug, 11th 2020 4:47 pm, Article Recommended by Dr. J. Smith

Subsidies for healthy food, plain packaging for unhealthy food, and more research into meat alternatives could help the UK's obesity crisis, according to a new report.

The report - Turning The Tables - by social policy think-tank Demos, found that too many people face "significant barriers to eating healthy diets".

It estimated that, before lockdown, 20 million people could not afford healthy food and 19 million people struggle to find healthy food in stores near their homes.

Rose Lasko-Skinner, one of Demos's lead researchers, said: "Ultimately that means people are going in to a shop and really struggling to come out with something that is both healthy and affordable."

The report recommended:

The government has estimated that two-thirds of UK adults are above a healthy weight, with 36% overweight and 28% obese. One in three children aged 10 and 11 are overweight or obese, and children living with obesity are five times more likely to become obese adults.

It is estimated that overweight and obesity-related conditions cost the NHS more than 6bn each year and there were nearly 900,000 obesity-related hospital admissions in 2018/19, with obesity a risk factor for chronic diseases including type 2 diabetes, some cancers, liver and respiratory disease.

A government spokesperson said: "We recently launched a world-leading obesity strategy to make the healthy choice the easy choice for families and help reduce obesity rates. It builds on existing progress, including the voluntary sugar reduction programme and wider reformulation programme with industry which resulted in a 2.9% reduction in average sugar across retail products in its first two years.

"Our Healthy Start scheme already supports pregnant women and young children from lower income families to access free fruit, vegetables, milk and vitamins to support a healthy lifestyle."

Zoe McIntyre, project manager for the Food Foundation's Right2Food campaign, said: "We've seen some really important government announcements recently, for example a new obesity strategy in July around making healthy food more affordable, which is a great start.

"But for some low-income families, healthy food still remains unaffordable. At the same time, during COVID-19 we've seen the spotlight on poor diets and how they're really affecting the nation. And these are issues that need to be addressed immediately."

Last month, the government launched its "Better Health" campaign, offering advice to 35 million people on how to lose weight and keep it off, supported by a 12-week plan, which will be seen as an attempt to put the country on a diet.

Other measures in the government's anti-obesity crackdown are expected to include:

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Meat alternatives and food subsidies could help 'millions of people lose weight' - Sky News

Jaggery and raisins: Add them to your diet to lose weight – Times of India

Aug, 11th 2020 4:47 pm, Article Recommended by Dr. J. Smith

Both jaggery and raisins are good for weight loss plan, but if you consume them in excess then it can lead to weight gain. So, eat in moderation.

Also, if you have diabetes then consult your doctor before including both the items in your diet. Remember that diet is certainly essential or weight loss, but you also need to exercise daily to burn calories and stay fit. Diet and exercises, both are essential for weight loss. In the absence of anyone, you won't be able to shed kilos.

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Jaggery and raisins: Add them to your diet to lose weight - Times of India

Losing weight after pregnancy why it’s so hard and how you can do it – Jamaica Observer

Aug, 11th 2020 4:47 pm, Article Recommended by Dr. J. Smith

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YOU can only use the 'I just had a baby' excuse for retaining the pudge for so long, but after that, you may have to admit that losing weight after pregnancy is hard, and will take some lifestyle changes.

Many new moms face this challenge how to get the drive to get to the gym or into a fitness programme, when they're worrying about daycare and breastfeeding, late night feedings and doctors visits, and all the other demands that come with a baby.

And so mom's fitness is often the last item on her list, until pretty soon the baby is two, heading off to kindergarten, and mom is wondering why she still has that mummy tummy.

Why is it so hard to lose weight after having a baby?

Indeed, weight loss after pregnancy can prove more difficult for some women than others. The success, even for those with a strict fitness routine, will depend on body type and metabolism.

There are also some women who believe that exercise will alter the nutritional quality of the breast milk, or cause the supply of milk to dry up, but these are unfounded.

Standardised exercise is very important to the holistic recovery of women after they give birth, and if left unattended, that mummy tummy may become permanent. So what can you do?

Start early

Strict, rigid exercise sessions are not recommended initially, but once you get the all-clear from the doctor, try to work out for a few minutes each day. This can be as simple as walking around the community with the baby.

Eat right

Fitness and weight loss cannot be achieved if you are not willing to eat healthy and rest. It is useless doing one without the other. Sure you are breastfeeding and need the extra calories, but these should not come as empty calories and fatty foods. Eat healthy and in the correct proportions, and get adequate rest.

Eat on time

While motherhood comes with time constraints, you should not force your body to operate on one or two meals daily. This is a sure recipe for overeating. Rather, set a schedule as best as you can, to have your meals on time and in the right proportions.

There are a number of routines specifically designed for women after childbirth, even at home. These include:

Spot jogging

All this requires is that you jog on the spot for 30 seconds to one minute, which means that you can get this done while you do housework, or while the kids are doing their homework.

Body weight squats

Stand with legs shoulder-width apart, lower yourself as if sitting on a chair (keep knees behind toes), then return to start and squeeze the glutes. Do three sets of 15 to 20 repetitions. If you have a dumb bell you can add this to the routine and grab a pair of resistance bands to add resistance.

Bicycle crunches

Lie flat on the floor with your lower back pressed to the ground and pull your navel in this will target your deep abs. Put your hands behind your head and bring your knees in towards your chest and lift your shoulder blades off the ground, but be sure not to pull on your neck. Straighten your right leg out to about a 45-degree angle to the ground while turning your upper body to the left, bringing your right elbow towards the left knee. Make sure your rib cage is moving and not just your elbows. Now switch sides and do the same motion on the other side to complete one repetition. Do three sets of 20 repetitions.

Squat jacks

Start with your feet together, then squat down into a chair pose with your back straight and hips back. Stay low, jump with your feet out into a squat position, then return to chair pose. Do three sets of these for 20 repetitions each.

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Losing weight after pregnancy why it's so hard and how you can do it - Jamaica Observer