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New Pro-Vegan TV Advert Promotes Benefits Of Plant-Based Meat – Plant Based News

Jan, 8th 2021 2:50 pm, Article Recommended by Dr. J. Smith

Reading Time: 2 minutes

A vegan meat brand is launching two new products this Veganuary and will promote their benefits via a TV advert.

Vivera, known for its plant-based steak, will also use the ad to urge people to try a vegan diet for 30 days. It aims to achieve 50,000 sign-ups to the app in January across the UK, Holland and Germany.

The advert, which will run on Channel 4, will showcase Viveras new Lincolnshire Style Sausages and Southern Fried Nuggets. They are both launching in Sainsburys this month.

Vivera has partnered food awareness organisationProVeg Internationalto promote plant-based eating via its Veggie Challenge App.

This pledge sees participants sign up to try being vegan, vegetarian or flexitarian for 30 days.

The pledge offers an app providing free support. This comes in the form of recipes, and tips. It also offers info about how much land, CO2, water and animals participants have saved.

In a statement sent to Plant Based News, Willem van Weede, CEO of Vivera, said: We are really fuelling our growth objectives with this media campaign and new product launches.

Our aim is to make the switch to plant-based as easy as possible for consumers with our great products, delicious recipes and Provegs Veggie Challenge app.

This Veganuary we want plant-based dining to become the new normal, as consumers become more aware of the benefits of plant-based diets for the environment, our health, and for animals.

Rosie Bambaji, Buyer, Fresh Plant-Based at Sainsburys, added: The plant-based category is booming. Were delighted to exclusively launch Viveras new Lincolnshire Style Sausages and Southern Fried Nuggets with BBQ Sauce.

Consumers now have more choice than ever. Were sure Veganuary 2021 will be successful in encouraging more people to try the wide range of tasty plant-based foods on offer.

Consumers can download the Veggie Challenge App from theApple App StoreandGoogle Play. The Vivera TV advert promoting the app is currently running on Channel 4.

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New Pro-Vegan TV Advert Promotes Benefits Of Plant-Based Meat - Plant Based News

You may have trendy eating habits, but your pet shouldnt – WYTV

Jan, 8th 2021 2:50 pm, Article Recommended by Dr. J. Smith

Animals have vastly different nutritional needs than humans

by: Len Rome

(WYTV) You might be a vegetarian, but nutritionists say your pet shouldnt be.

Its a bad idea to apply some popular diet trends to your animals pets are not people.

Dr. Valerie Parker has heard it all when it comes to alternative pet diets.

She said animals have vastly different nutritional needs than humans. Those who are meat-free should not put their pets on a vegetarian or vegan diet.

Cats are carnivores, Parker said. Now that doesnt mean that cats cant tolerate carbohydrates and plant sources of food in their food, but they are designed to eat certain meats.

Others may feed their pets a raw meat diet with the belief that dogs and cats should eat like their wolf and wild cat ancestors. But no our domesticated animals have evolved. They need the right combination of meat and carbs.

Some pet owners may be tempted to make their own pet food, but most homemade pet food recipes dont contain the nutrients your pet needs and can cause severe health issues.

There is so much misinformation online that can make unhealthy pet diets seem like a good idea. Your veterinarian is the best person to go to for advice.

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You may have trendy eating habits, but your pet shouldnt - WYTV

Nutrition and mental health: Is there a link? – Medical News Today

Jan, 8th 2021 2:50 pm, Article Recommended by Dr. J. Smith

Diet influences numerous aspects of health, including weight, athletic performance, and risk of chronic diseases, such as heart disease and type 2 diabetes. According to some research, it may affect mental health, too.

Anxiety and depression are among the most common mental health conditions worldwide. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), depression could be one of the top health concerns in the world by 2030.

Therefore, it is not surprising that researchers continue to search for new ways to reduce the impact of mental health conditions, rather than relying on current therapies and medications.

Nutritional psychiatry is an emerging area of research specifically looking at the role of nutrition in the development and treatment of mental health problems.

The two main questions that researchers are asking in relation to the role of nutrition in mental health are, Does diet help prevent mental health conditions? and, Are nutrition interventions helpful in the treatment of these conditions?

Article highlights:

Several observational studies have shown a link between overall diet quality and the risk of depression.

For example, one review of 21 studies from 10 countries found that a healthful dietary pattern characterized by high intakes of fruit, vegetables, whole grains, olive oil, fish, low fat dairy, and antioxidants, as well as low intakes of animal foods was associated with a reduced risk of depression.

Conversely, a Western-style diet involving a high intake of red and processed meats, refined grains, sweets, high fat dairy products, butter, and potatoes, as well as a low intake of fruit and vegetables was linked with a significantly increased risk of depression.

An older review found similar results, with high compliance with a Mediterranean diet being associated with a 32% reduced risk of depression.

More recently, a study looking at adults over the age of 50 years found a link between higher levels of anxiety and diets high in saturated fat and added sugars.

Interestingly, researchers have noted similar findings in kids and teenagers.

For example, a 2019 review of 56 studies found an association between a high intake of healthful foods, such as olive oil, fish, nuts, legumes, dairy products, fruits, and vegetables, and a reduced risk of depression during adolescence.

However, it is important to keep in mind that while observational studies can show an association, they cannot prove cause and effect.

Also, even with randomized controlled trials, there are several limitations when it comes to nutrition research studies, including difficulties with accurately measuring food intake.

Researchers often rely on participants recalling what they have eaten in previous days, weeks, or months, but no ones memory is perfect.

The research into whether dietary interventions can help treat mental health problems is relatively new and still quite limited.

The SMILES trial was one of the first randomized controlled trials to examine the role of diet in the treatment of depression.

Over 12 weeks, 67 individuals with moderate or severe depression received either dietary counseling or social support in addition to their current treatment.

The dietary intervention was similar to a Mediterranean diet, in that it emphasized vegetables, fruits, whole grains, oily fish, extra virgin olive oil, legumes, and raw nuts. It also allowed for moderate amounts of red meat and dairy.

At the end of the study, those in the diet group had significantly greater improvements in depression symptoms. These improvements remained significant even when the scientists accounted for confounding variables, including body mass index (BMI), physical activity, and smoking.

Furthermore, only 8% of individuals in the control group achieved remission, compared with 32% of those in the diet group.

Although these results seem promising, the SMILES study was a small, short-term study. As a result, larger, longer term studies are necessary to apply its findings to a larger population.

Replicating the findings is important because not all research agrees with them. For instance, in a study that recruited 1,025 adults with overweight or obesity and at least mild depressive symptoms, researchers investigated the impact of both a multinutrient supplement and food-related behavioral activation on mental health outcomes.

The scientists found no significant difference in depressive episodes compared with a placebo after 12 months.

In the same year, though, a meta-analysis of 16 randomized controlled studies did find that dietary interventions significantly reduced symptoms of depression, but not those of anxiety.

It is, therefore, difficult to draw solid conclusions from the existing body of research, particularly as the type of dietary intervention under investigation has varied greatly among studies.

Overall, more research is needed on the topic of specific dietary patterns and the treatment of mental health conditions. In particular, there is a need for a more standardized definition of a healthful diet, as well as for larger, long-term studies.

In addition to dietary patterns, scientists are interested in the potential effects that individual nutrients in the form of dietary supplements might have on mental health.

Scientists have found links between low levels of certain nutrients such as folate, magnesium, iron, zinc, and vitamins B6, B12, and D and worsening mood, feelings of anxiety, and risk of depression.

However, there is inconclusive evidence on whether consuming extra amounts of these nutrients in supplement form offers further benefits for mental health.

For instance, if someone is deficient in magnesium, for example, taking a magnesium supplement might help improve symptoms. However, if someone is getting adequate amounts of magnesium in their diet, it is unclear whether taking a supplement will provide any benefits.

Omega-3 fatty acids are essential fats that play a key role in brain development and cell signaling. An article in Frontiers in Physiology discusses how they reduce levels of inflammation.

Due to their anti-inflammatory effects and importance in brain health, scientists have investigated omega-3s for their potential effects on mental health.

While more research is still needed, in 2018 and 2019, reviews of randomized controlled trials found omega-3 supplements to be effective in the treatment of anxiety and depression in adults.

However, as with vitamin and mineral supplements, it remains unclear whether omega-3 supplementation can help improve mood in most individuals or whether it is primarily effective in those with the lowest intake of omega-3s.

Overall, when it comes to taking supplements for mental health, there is still a lot we do not know, including what the optimal doses are for various populations and the long-term safety and effectiveness.

Therefore, experts recommend acquiring the majority of these nutrients through a healthful and varied diet. Anyone who is concerned that they are unable to meet their nutrient needs through diet alone should speak with a doctor to discuss whether supplements may be helpful.

While there is a need for further research, observational studies suggest, overall, that there is a link between what people eat and their mental health. Why nutrition may have this effect is still unknown, though.

There are several theories on how diet may influence mood or the risk of conditions such as depression and anxiety.

Some scientists believe that the inflammatory effects of certain dietary patterns might help explain the relationship between diet and mental health.

Several mental health conditions appear to have links with increased levels of inflammation. The authors of journal articles in Frontiers in Immunology and Current Neuropharmacology discuss this relationship.

For example, diets associated with benefits for mental health tend to be high in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and healthful fats all of which are foods rich in anti-inflammatory compounds.

A review of observational studies supports this theory, as diets high in antioxidants and anti-inflammatory foods were associated with a reduced risk of depression.

Still, the exact relationship between diet, inflammation, and alterations in mental health is not well-understood.

Another possible explanation is that diet may affect the bacteria in the gut, which people often refer to as the gut microbiome.

Ongoing research has found a strong link between gut health and brain function. For example, healthy bacteria in the gut produce approximately 90% of the neurotransmitter serotonin, which affects mood.

Furthermore, early research shows a potential link between a healthy gut microbiome and lower rates of depression.

As diet plays a major role in the health and diversity of the gut microbiome, this theory is a promising explanation for how what we eat may be affecting our mental well-being.

Finally, there is the possibility that diet plays a more indirect role in mental health.

It may be that individuals with healthful diets are more likely to engage in behaviors that are also linked with a reduced risk of mental health conditions, such as engaging in regular physical activity, practicing good sleep habits, and refraining from smoking.

It is important to keep in mind that many factors can influence both eating habits and mental health.

According to MentalHealth.gov, factors that can contribute to mental health conditions include biological factors, such as genetics, life experiences, and family history. Socioeconomic status can also affect mental health, as can access to food and overall diet quality.

Mental health can, in turn, affect eating habits. For example, it is not uncommon to turn to less healthful foods, such as sweets or highly processed snack foods, when feeling angry or upset.

Similarly, many antidepressants and anti-anxiety medications can increase appetite and cravings. In both of these situations, struggling with mental health can make adhering to a healthful diet more difficult.

Overall, while diet may be an important factor for mental health, it is important to remember that many other aspects of life can also contribute to mood.

The study of nutrition and how it affects mental health is ongoing.

And while more research is needed, current studies suggest that we may have some influence over our mental health through our food choices.

Still, we need to keep in mind that diet is just one piece of the much more complex topic that is mental health.

As a result, it is important for anyone who is experiencing depression or anxiety symptoms or has general concerns about their mental well-being to work with a trusted healthcare provider to develop a personalized treatment plan.

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Nutrition and mental health: Is there a link? - Medical News Today

A Different Story about the Origin and Development of Alternative Protein in China – The Poultry Site

Jan, 8th 2021 2:50 pm, Article Recommended by Dr. J. Smith

Contrary to recent popular belief that Chinas alternative protein market is still in its very early stage, the industry can be traced back as early as the Western Han Dynasty (202 BC 8 AD), when the King of Huainan Liu An invented tofu, the key ingredients and excellent protein for traditional vegetarian diets.

However, vegetarian diets did not become popular and specialised until the Song Dynasty (960 1279). This is also the first time that imitation meat is served in family kitchens and local restaurants, made from flour, taro, soybeans, etc. One important point to note is that, people in the Song Dynasty were used to identifying meat dishes with vulgar noveau riche, while vegetarian diets were deemed as elegant and noble.

For example, one of Chinas famous ancient paintings Night Revels of Hanxizai graphically illustrates the dining habits of the upper class during that period. Despite his position as a senior official, Hanxizai treated each distinguished guest with only eight lightly flavoured dishes, rather than an abundance of fish and meat.

(One section of Night Revels of Hanxizai)

With Buddhisms introduction into China, vegetarian diets were further popularised both in the palace and outside, or in the form of temple cuisine. The Buddhist blessings and religious concept of ahimsa non-violence to all creatures reflected their concerns about health and animal welfare at that time.

The long history and development of vegetarian diets seems a good premise for the introduction of alternative protein products to modern Chinese consumers today. Nevertheless, just as a coin has two sides, the longstanding development of vegetarian diets could also impose both positive and negative impacts on its successor plant-based meat alternatives.

Local traditional vegetarian processing plants and restaurants: Stereotyped consumer group

Whole Perfect Food (Qi Shan), one of Chinas leading vegetarian processors, has produced and distributed dozens of plant-based pork, beef, chicken, mutton and fish products through online e-commerce platforms like Tmall and JD, offline vegetarian restaurants and local temples over the past 30 years.

With Buddhisms introduction into China, vegetarian diets were further popularised both in the palace and outside, or in the form of temple cuisine. The Buddhist blessings and religious concept of ahimsa non-violence to all creatures reflected their concerns about health and animal welfare at that time.

The long history and development of vegetarian diets seems a good premise for the introduction of alternative protein products to modern Chinese consumers today. Nevertheless, just as a coin has two sides, the longstanding development of vegetarian diets could also impose both positive and negative impacts on its successor plant-based meat alternatives.

Local traditional vegetarian processing plants and restaurants: Stereotyped consumer group

Whole Perfect Food (Qi Shan), one of Chinas leading vegetarian processors, has produced and distributed dozens of plant-based pork, beef, chicken, mutton and fish products through online e-commerce platforms like Tmall and JD, offline vegetarian restaurants and local temples over the past 30 years.

However, despite its time-honored reputation and largest market share among Chinas vegetarian processing industry, its annual operating revenue was only half of that of Beyond Meat in 2018. The major reason is that although vegetarianism and veganism have existed for more than 2,000 years in China, it is still considered as a niche market with a highly stereotyped consumer group, which mainly consists of Buddhists, Taoists and macrobiotic adherents for religious and personal health purposes.

Local traditional meat producers and processors: a prompt cross-category extension

While domestic vegetarian companies are actively seizing the opportunity to upgrade the image of their plant-based products, those traditional pig-breeding and meat processing companies are also taking the initiative to expand their product portfolio into the meat alternative area. Two typical examples are Tangrenshen Group and Shuanghui Development.

Tangrenshen, one of Chinas major pork producers, announced the setting up of the Tangrenshen Jiangnan University Innovative Food Joint Research Institute, focusing on the research and development of double protein meat (animal and plant protein).

Not to be outdone, Shuanghui, Chinas largest meat processor, acquired shares of DuPont Protein and DuPont Food this May. Both companies focus on the development of plant protein, a strong signal that Chinas traditional meat food companies have started to enter the emerging meat alternative area to further diversify their product mix and strengthen the overall competitiveness.

By joining up with Alibaba, Taobao and Tmall, Shuanghui launched its first limited edition plant-based protein product: the Shuanghui Soyfit Vegan Meat, with a key marketing concept that it is non-genetically modified, high in protein and dietary fiber, low in fat and cholesterol.

Shuangta Food: a role transformation from a raw material supplier of pea protein to a brand manufacturer of plant-based meat

Since Beyond Meat, a major stock in plant-based meat alternatives, went public last May on NASDAQ, the concept stocks related to meat alternatives in Chinas A share market have skyrocketed. Especially for Shuangta Food, its stock price reached five-day consecutive up limit last May, as it is regarded as Chinas most representative stock in this sector.

One unique advantage for Shuangta is its role as a direct raw material supplier to domestic plant-based meat brand Zhenmeat and overseas to Beyond Meat, and as an indirect supplier for KFCs plant-based fried chicken. It is the largest pea protein manufacturer both at home and abroad, accounting for 30%~40% of the global production capacity.

Shuangta announced the launch of its nine plant-based meat products at a press conference last month, including beef balls, minced pork cake, chicken cutlets, hams, sausages, etc. All are made of pea protein. Meanwhile, the company published its Peas Ecosystem Strategy, marking its transformation from a pure pea protein supplier to a brand manufacturer of plant-based meat.

The performance of overseas players in Chinas market: still in their pilot phase

The global medias attention focused on Chinas huge potential as a major untapped market, when the overseas market leader Beyond Meat announced to invest in the local processing industry and enter Chinas retail market by cooperating with Starbucks and Hema (Fresh Hippo) this year. Driven by such a trend, local startups, such as Starfield and Zhenmeat, are also eager to establish partnerships with foodservice enterprises.

However, the media coverage does not mean alternative protein has been accurately understood and widely accepted by Chinese consumers. Up to the end of this year, both local and overseas plant-based meat startups are just testing the waters with quite limited supply offerings in local restaurants. Out of these initiatives, the furniture retailer IKEA Shanghai, somewhat outshined others by its regular supply of plant-based products in its restaurants.

IKEA Shanghai: REGULARLY serving plant-based balls

IKEA Shanghai has made a good beginning in this emerging sector by serving plant-based balls as regular as their traditional Swedish meatballs in their five local restaurants since this November. But the feedback gathered by IQC Insights from onsite staff and customers reveals the majority of customers still simply regard this as an additional choice for vegetarians, and few directly connect the product with plant protein, animal welfare, environmental protection and even sustainable development.

The above two pictures show that the plant balls and traditional meatballs look similar, but they taste quite different. The plant balls, mostly made with pea protein, taste softer and looser than meatballs, which are made with pork and beef. To quantify such feelings, the meatballs need to be chewed for 30 times before swallowing, while plant balls only for 20 times. Furthermore, the meatballs have clear pork and beef smell and flavour, but plant balls are more neutral.

In terms of retail prices, the price of each plant ball is 114% more expensive than each Swedish meatball. This could explain why the sales volume of plant balls are currently much lower than that of meatballs, besides the smaller consumer group of vegetarians.

Opportunities and challenges under ASF and COVID-19

The outbreak and spreading of African Swine Fever (ASF) in China since August 2018 have caused a sharp decline in the domestic pork supply. The pork production for the first half of 2020 decreased by 19.1% year-on-year to 19.98 million tons, while for the full year of 2020, it is expected to reach 39.34 million tons, falling by 7.5% compared to 2019. ASF affected Chinas pork production mainly in 2019 and 2020, and the current live pig inventory level has recovered to 88% of the normal level at the end of 2017, just before the outbreak of ASF in China.

The reduced pork supply drove up the domestic live pig price by 123% compared to 2017. Consequently, local consumers consumption of pork has been heavily dampened. Under such circumstances, some price-sensitive consumers could turn to cheaper chicken, while those nutrition-focused buyers could replace pork with beef, due to their greatly-narrowed price gap from 2018 onwards.

The local pork supply-demand imbalance has also promoted a great increase in the import of pork and other meat categories, such as beef and chicken. In the first three quarters of this year, Chinas pork import volume reached 3.2 million tons, increasing by 142.5% on a y-o-y basis. However, such a situation could not continue indefinitely. As COVID-19 was brought under control in China but still runs riot across the world, local governments have frequently sounded alarms after detecting the virus on external packaging of imported frozen meat and seafood, triggering disruptive import bans on numerous overseas plants. Up to now, three of Chinas four major frozen food market have suspended transaction to conduct overall testing and disinfection. Whats worse, confidence among local meat processors, retailers and consumers has slumped.

However, the crisis in domestic and imported pork supply is also creating new opportunities for innovative products. A new trend under COVID-19 is a demand for higher protein in peoples daily diet. Chinese medical experts claim that high protein intake can help enhance immunity and better protect people from being infected by COVID-19. Accordingly, local consumer behaviour is also changing. More and more people are considering replacing traditional animal meat products with alternative protein products. This is a good chance for plant-based or cell-based products to enter this huge market.

In addition, the social distancing policy during the epidemic period also drives people to purchase semi-cooked and pre-packaged food online, instead of buying fresh meat in wet markets or dining in offline restaurants. This also coincides with the consumption patterns and channels of plant-based meat products.

But challenges also come with the opportunities. COVID-19 has caused local consumers to raise their expectations about food safety and quality, causing some consumer groups to be less open to try novel and emerging food categories.

A key question: Is alternative protein a red or blue ocean market in China?

Before answering this critical question, every stakeholder in Chinas alternative protein sector should first ask themselves: What products do I plan to provide for this unique market?

It would be a red ocean or saturated market that has evolved for more than 2,000 years, if the new plant-based meat alternatives are not able to differentiate themselves significantly from the existing local vegetarian or vegan products.

Although few emerging plant or cell-based meat brands position themselves as vegetarian companies, local consumers just conventionally think so. The above-mentioned IKEA Restaurant is a good example of such a dilemma. This makes it more important for new products to stand out based on their key attributes: taste, smell, texture, nutritional profile or functionality.

In other words, the market opportunity will depend on the attributes and novelty of the product itself. To correctly identify and develop this potential blue ocean market, it is crucial to redefine a product solution first and reconstruct the market boundary beyond any meat or vegetarian products. Such a new product should aim to cater to this new demand created by the value proposition of new entrants and, as such, target at the right consumer groups, who are open-minded enough to test it and incorporate it in their dietary routines.

To fulfill the above strategic steps, localisation is a key element. The Chinese market is huge, supported by the largest consumer base in the world. But this market is also highly diversified by different provinces, first/ second/ third -tier cities, different generations, different income groups, etc. No matter how large and successful a company might be, its capital and resources would still be limited in the face of so many and so large consumer segments in the Chinese market.

As reported by Angela Zhang, Head of Business Intelligence Division, IQC Insights

Want to know more about how to segment Chinas huge food market in the context of the emerging alternative protein opportunity? How to precisely target at the niche consumer group? How to position your company to outshine other domestic and overseas peers? Please visit any of the two websites below for our latest in-depth study Chinese Protein Alternative Market The Next Front in Alternative Proteins:

http://www.iqc-insights.com/subscribe.html

http://www.iqc-china.com/en/newsinfo.php?id=3150

Based in Shanghai, IQC insights is a research & analysis company focusing on both Chinas traditional animal protein and the emerging protein alternative industries.

Their mission is to provide clients and partners with exclusive and trustworthy analysis and market understanding to guide and inform on major trends and the driving forces shaping the future of Chinas animal protein and alternative protein markets.

For more data and insights related to China's pork market, please contact the author [emailprotected] or subscribe at IQC Insights here.

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A Different Story about the Origin and Development of Alternative Protein in China - The Poultry Site

806 Health Tip: A Few Diets To Try In The New Year – mix941kmxj.com

Jan, 8th 2021 2:50 pm, Article Recommended by Dr. J. Smith

This is the time of year when we try to eat healthy. You may decide 2021 is the year to get in shape. We know that weight loss is eighty percent diet and twenty percent exercise. So we need to do more than just workout. We need to follow a healthy way of eating as well.

There are so many diets out there. How do you know what will work best for you? You will just have to look it over and decide if it will fit your lifestyle. Is it a diet that if you get invited out to eat you can still follow? Or will you just have to use a cheat day? Those are ok too. Don't totally go all in without having a day or so to eat what you want. If you totally deprive yourself you may lose weight but you won't be able to maintain it.

So what are some diets that you can try in the new year? There may be some diets you have never tried before or even heard of.

There is the Mediterranean Diet. It is pretty easy to follow and is probably the best for maintaining once you lose that weight. Plus I am all in for a diet that allows wine. You get to eat a lot of fish, fruits, veggies and nuts. Seems pretty good.

There is another diet called the Flexitarian Diet. Now on this one you will be eating mostly vegetables. You can eat some meat but mostly this is a vegetarian diet. So if you can do that then you may give it a try.

When you are looking at diets that are the easiest to stick to the Mediterranean Diet still finishes first. Weight Watchers is not a bad one either. It is pretty easy to maintain and keep up with.

I think I am still going to stick with my Intermittent fasting. That has been the most successful for me. I also don't have a hard time eating in a specified time period. Usually I eat between the hours of 10 am and 6 pm. If I have plans to go out to eat I adjust my times accordingly. So if I have to wait a little later in the morning to start eating I am ok. I don't want to miss out on time with friends.

So what diets have you tried that were successful and easy to maintain? Comment below.

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806 Health Tip: A Few Diets To Try In The New Year - mix941kmxj.com

Pale and gelatinous: I tried vegan seafood so you don’t have to – The Guardian

Jan, 8th 2021 2:50 pm, Article Recommended by Dr. J. Smith

My friend Henry walked into my kitchen and eyed the can of vegan skallops on the counter. My goal for the week was to try as many vegan seafood items as possible. I wanted to know if I could learn to love them, and if they could replace seafood the way Beyond Meat has replaced burgers in my house.

Youre not really going to eat those, are you? he said while raising an eyebrow. The skallops looked pale and gelatinous.

Im going to try, I said.

One of my very first jobs was at a restaurant on the Cape, he said. I had to plunge my hand into a bucket of freezing cold sea water and take the penis off of scallops before they were served.

So youd try vegan scallops instead? I asked, hopeful I could enlist him in my taste test.

Never, he said, looking resolute.

Later, when I produced a plate of small toasts with vegan tuna salad, Henry shook his head. It looks like Fancy Feast, he said, thinking of the cat food.

I couldnt disagree.

Oh Mom, my eldest daughter said, cruising through the kitchen, eyeing the plate of vegan tuna toasts. Please dont make us eat that.

Once, when I was taking a class on food systems in graduate school, my professor said: Its safer to eat the food that our grandparents ate, food with less processing. Food that occurs naturally.

I know for a fact my grandmother Alma Jean never once tried vegan skallops. I can see her now with a Marlboro Red tucked into the side of her mouth, asking: What the hell is a vegan scallop? She, like many people in the world, was just working hard to get by, and she liked to fish the Atlantic Ocean and Smith Mountain Lake.

But Alma Jean never heard about climate change before she passed.

The World Wildlife Fund estimates that nearly 3 billion people in the world rely on seafood as a primary protein source. When the ocean is overheated and overfished, and fisheries are depleted as scientists suggest they are on track to be by 2048 the most vulnerable of the worlds populations will suffer most.

When Elizabeth Warren added the Blue New Deal as part of her platform in the presidential primary, she acknowledged that threats like warming oceans and overfishing have caused the oceans fish population to fall by 50% over the last 50 years, leading to cascading ecological consequences, hurting regional and local economies, and risking hunger and even conflict.

There is a moral and financial imperative to change our relationship with seafood but what does that look like on the plate?

You could arrive at vegan seafood from many places. Perhaps, like my daughter, you have an earnest mother. Perhaps youre aware of overfishing, realizing that nearly 90% of global fish stocks are fully exploited, overexploited, or on the verge of collapse. That might bother you because you like to eat fish, or because you think its amoral to cause such suffering.

No one really likes to talk about suffering. I remember finding out that fish are sentient and feel pain. Scientists have identified that fish have sophisticated behavioral and cognitive patterns and pain perception at least as much as other vertebrates.

When accused of confusing consumers with vegan seafood labels that look like the real thing, activists in Australia countered with a suggestion to label cans of actual tuna. I think honesty in labelling is a good idea, but it should go both ways, activist Greg McFarlane said. Consumers should be aware of what the product is that theyre buying, and how much suffering went into it.

According to scientists, theres a large gap between peoples perception of fish intelligence and the scientific reality. Most of us dont see fish in their natural habitat hunting, rearing young, engaging in complex mating rituals. And most of us dont witness the violence of the bottom trawler as it ransacks the seafloor ecosystem, or the endangered right whale starving while ensnared in long-line fishing gear offshore, or the hundreds of thousands of sea turtles and dolphins dying as commercial bycatch. Scientists estimate that roughly 50 billion aquatic animals die in service of the American diet each year.

The suffering of species plus the looming shortage from overfishing makes a good case for an alternative seafood product like Tuno. Without alternative protein creation, a representative from the company said, we will face protein shortages in the very near future.

I have little interest in judging people who eat seafood. Though Ive been a vegetarian since I was 12, I grew up near the coast of eastern North Carolina, and have always liked seafood. Sometimes I even give into the craving.

Once, while pregnant with my second daughter, I ate a lobster roll alone in my car in the outskirts of Kennebunkport, crying between bites, thinking about the monogamy of lobsters. In 2019, I let an intimidating waitress strong-arm me into a delicious blackened mahi-mahi sandwich in the Everglades. (It was incredible; I still think about it.)

Choosing a vegetarian diet as a pre-teen in the rural south where people can pursue PhDs in barbecue often put sketch comedy into ordering a meal. You sure you dont want any meat in that bun, Honey? the kind lady would ask at the drive-thru. Well-intentioned hosts presented plates of turkey burgers or fish.

Renowned scientist Dr Sylvia Earle speaks to the tendency of people to forget that fish are indeed meat. Its baffling, she said. You know people say, Im a vegetarian, I just eat fish, no meat. And I can see the fish being really offended: What do you mean. Im a piece of meat! I have muscle, I have a heart, I have a brain. We have this attitude of fish as somehow just commodities.

But after finishing a recent column on the state of fisheries in America, I no longer feel good about purchasing most seafood, especially Pacific bluefin tuna, which scientists estimate is at 4% of the original breeding population.

Dr Ayana Johnson, co-author of the Blue New Deal, believes there are still local American fishermen fishing responsibly, and worthy of our support. She suggests eating lower on the food chain. Instead of tuna, eat sardines and anchovies those little ones that are reproducing super-quickly, she says. Ocean farming of shellfish oysters, mussels and clams and seaweed is super-sustainable.

Given my carnivorous nuclear familys recent embrace of Beyond Burgers and Impossible Meat, I also had faith that capitalism might lead us to an edible alternative to seafood.

Impossible Meat used science to replicate the taste, smell and mouth-feel of hamburger meat. My friends who could never fully embrace bean and mushroom-flecked veggie burgers actually like the taste of Impossible burgers. Yes Impossible Burgers are one more thing to buy and ship, but on the upside, they allegedly generate 87% less greenhouse gases than traditional beef.

So could I like vegan seafood as much as I like Impossible Burgers? Im the target market for vegetarian seafood options like those by Quorn, Tuno, Toona and Good Catch and after tasting several options, I can report it didnt win me over yet.

Im apparently not the only vegetarian holding back. Reports indicate that seafood currently accounts for only 1% of the vegan meat market but remains an enormous future opportunity. Companies are even generating cell-based, cultured seafood.

Perhaps there will come a day when thats not the case. Like many things we arent used to, moving our seafood diet in a more sustainable direction is going to take experimentation and work. It may mean letting go of staples like tuna, thinking harder about our choices at supermarkets and restaurants, and trying things we think are gross.

Dont yuck somebody elses yum, someone at school once told my daughter. Thats how I feel about vegan seafood. If its your yum, good for you. We need innovation there are old, important and complex systems breaking down on our watch, systems that affect human lives, the lives of other species, the character and livelihoods of communities, our plates, our culture, our health.

I understand that its hard to give up what we love, what we feel entitled to, what weve always eaten, what provides much-needed money to fishing communities. Truthfully, I dont think well ever make meaningful progress until we look at all the points of suffering in the entire system: the aquatic species, the ecosystems, and the laborers and communities that rely on them for income.

In order to lessen your impact on our struggling ocean, you dont even have to eat processed vegan seafood. You can forgo seafood and contribute to organizations that help restore ocean health. You can make your own vegan scallops from mushrooms. You can substitute chickpeas for tuna in tuna salad.

When I used to make real tuna salad for my family, my rescue cats would sprint downstairs from their napping places, begging me for a flake of fish.

This week I set the metal bowl of faux tuna down, a final taste test. The cats inspected it and backed away. My dog Radish finished the batch.

Go here to see the original:
Pale and gelatinous: I tried vegan seafood so you don't have to - The Guardian

Things to Do: Entertainment in the Midland, Great Lakes Bay region – Midland Daily News

Jan, 8th 2021 2:50 pm, Article Recommended by Dr. J. Smith

Saturday,Jan.9:Come Meet the Makers,an event toshowcase and support local makers and growers, is set for7:30 a.m. to noon atLive Oak Coffeehouse,711 Ashman St. Midland.(Photo/Live Oak Coffeehouse)

Saturday,Jan.9:Come Meet the Makers,an event toshowcase and support local makers and growers, is set for7:30 a.m. to noon atLive Oak Coffeehouse,711 Ashman St. Midland.(Photo/Live Oak

Saturday,Jan.9:Come Meet the Makers,an event toshowcase and support local makers and growers, is set for7:30 a.m. to noon atLive Oak Coffeehouse,711 Ashman St. Midland.(Photo/Live Oak Coffeehouse)

Saturday,Jan.9:Come Meet the Makers,an event toshowcase and support local makers and growers, is set for7:30 a.m. to noon atLive Oak Coffeehouse,711 Ashman St. Midland.(Photo/Live Oak

Things to Do: Entertainment in the Midland, Great Lakes Bay region

Saturday, Jan. 9

Come Meet the Makers, an event to showcase and support local makers and growers, is set for 7:30 a.m. to noon at Live Oak Coffeehouse, 711 Ashman St. Midland. There will be two to eight vendors every Saturday through April, picking up where the Midland Farmer's Market left off and takes a break for the season. All vendors and patrons will adhere to current mask and social distancing guidelines, and hosts will limit traffic and gathering in common areas, provide opportunities for sanitizing. Interested in being a vendor? Sign up on the following form to inquire about being added to the schedule: http://bit.ly/MeettheMakers2020.

A Bottle and Can Drive is set for 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Lowe's in Midland, to help support the local and international humanitarian efforts of The Glory Ministry. A drop and go location for donations will be at Lowe's, 1918 Airport Road in Midland, also on Jan.16 and 23. People who are unable to make these dates or times can contact Robert at 989-324-8937 or visit http://www.thegloryministry.org

Monday, Jan. 11

Evening Snowshoe Hike is set for 5 to 6:30 p.m. at the Chippewa Nature Center in Midland. Come discover the beauty of a winter night! We will look for signs of animals, study tree silhouettes and enjoy the winter sky. Bring a headlamp or flashlight. Ages 15 and older; younger than 18 with adult. Reserve snowshoes online or call 989-631-0830. Registration required. http://www.chippewanaturecenter.org

Wednesday, Jan. 13

Evening Snowshoe Hike is set for 5 to 6:30 p.m. at the Chippewa Nature Center in Midland. Come discover the beauty of a winter night! We will look for signs of animals, study tree silhouettes and enjoy the winter sky. Bring a headlamp or flashlight. Ages 15 and older; younger than 18 with adult. Reserve snowshoes online or call 989-631-0830. Registration required. http://www.chippewanaturecenter.org

Saturday, Jan. 16

Come Meet the Makers, an event to showcase and support local makers and growers, is set for 7:30 a.m. to noon at Live Oak Coffeehouse, 711 Ashman St. Midland. There will be two to eight vendors every Saturday through April, picking up where the Midland Farmer's Market left off and takes a break for the season. All vendors and patrons will adhere to current mask and social distancing guidelines, and hosts will limit traffic and gathering in common areas, provide opportunities for sanitizing. Interested in being a vendor? Sign up on the following form to inquire about being added to the schedule: http://bit.ly/MeettheMakers2020.

A Bottle and Can Drive is set for 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Lowe's in Midland, to help support the local and international humanitarian efforts of The Glory Ministry. A drop and go location for donations will be at Lowe's, 1918 Airport Road in Midland, also on Jan. 23. People who are unable to make these dates or times can contact Robert at 989-324-8937 or visit http://www.thegloryministry.org

Monday, Jan. 18

Van Jones, a political commentator who regularly appears on nationally-televised TV programs, will deliver the keynote address for the 12th annual Great Lakes Bay Regional Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration. This year's event will be presented virtually. Jones will appear 7 p.m.in an Saginaw Valley State University-hosted live event, streamed free online. To view the event, participants must register at svsu.edu/mlk. The program will include the presentation of regional scholarship awards by the Bay Area, Midland Area and Saginaw community foundations to high school seniors who have embodied Martin Luther King Jr.'s ideals.

Tuesday, Jan. 19

Life on Other Worlds with National Geographic LIVE is set for 7 p.m. Join MATRIX:MIDLAND as part of Midland Center for the Arts Virtual Pass to learn about Life on Other Worlds with National Geographic Live. How close are we to discovering life on other planets? NASAs Perseverance rover is due to land on Mars in 2021 to search for signs of ancient life and collect rock and soil samples for possible return to Earth. Jupiters moon Europa is home to a vast subsurface oceana body of water that could sustain primitive forms of life on this alien world nearly 600 million miles from our planet. Join planetary scientist and astrobiologist Kevin Peter Hand and NASA engineer Kobie Boykins for the latest intriguing updates on this vast frontier of exploration. This event is included with a subscription to Midland Centers Virtual Pass at just $9.99/month. Purchase online at midlandcenter.org or by calling the box office at 989-631-5930.

Evening Snowshoe Hike is set for 5 to 6:30 p.m. at the Chippewa Nature Center in Midland. Come discover the beauty of a winter night! We will look for signs of animals, study tree silhouettes and enjoy the winter sky. Bring a headlamp or flashlight. Ages 15 and older; younger than 18 with adult. Reserve snowshoes online or call 989-631-0830. Registration required. http://www.chippewanaturecenter.org

Thursday, Jan. 21

Family Snowshoe Hike is set for 4 to 5:30 p.m. at the Chippewa Nature Center in Midland. Event is for ages 5 and older with adult. Reserve snowshoes online or call 989-631-0830. Registration required. Bring the whole family for an afternoon of exploration on snowshoes - no experience needed! We will search high and low for signs of animals as we explore on and off trails. Please bring a sled to pull younger children. http://www.chippewanaturecenter.org

Friday, Jan. 22

Virtual Q&A with Midland Inventor Steve Dombrowski will begin at 7 p.m. online via Zoom. The link for the webinar is https://bit.ly/2XfUOw1 and the passcode to the Zoom event is 071552. Dombrowski invented a shovel lever attachment that helps lift snow and other heavy materials, carrying most the weight. Attendees will have the opportunity to ask him questions about his invention.

Saturday, Jan. 23

Reimagining Dinosaurs with National Geographic is a live event set for 7 p.m. Join MATRIX:MIDLAND as part of Midland Center for the Arts Virtual Pass to Reimagine Dinosaurs with National Geographic Live. Groundbreaking new science is changing what we thought we knew about how dinosaurs looked, moved, and lived. New-found troves from the Moroccan desert suggest that the immense predator Spinosaurus spent much of its time in the water. And in Chile, scientists have discovered a shocking new therapod. Unlike its cousins, Velociraptor and T. rex, Chilesaurus consumed a vegetarian diet. Join leading paleontologists Nizar Ibrahim and Sebastin Rozadilla for stories and conversation about the evolving science of dinosaurs. This event is included with a subscription to Midland Centers Virtual Pass at just $9.99/month. Purchase online at midlandcenter.org or by calling the box office at 989-631-5930.

Come Meet the Makers, an event to showcase and support local makers and growers, is set for 7:30 a.m. to noon at Live Oak Coffeehouse, 711 Ashman St. Midland. There will be two to eight vendors every Saturday through April, picking up where the Midland Farmer's Market left off and takes a break for the season. All vendors and patrons will adhere to current mask and social distancing guidelines, and hosts will limit traffic and gathering in common areas, provide opportunities for sanitizing. Interested in being a vendor? Sign up on the following form to inquire about being added to the schedule: http://bit.ly/MeettheMakers2020.

A Bottle and Can Drive is set for 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Lowe's in Midland, to help support the local and international humanitarian efforts of The Glory Ministry. A drop and go location for donations will be at Lowe's, 1918 Airport Road in Midland. People who are unable to make these dates or times can contact Robert at 989-324-8937 or visit http://www.thegloryministry.org

Snowshoe Sampler is set for 10 a.m. to noon at Chippewa Nature Center in Midland. Free for all ages, 18 and younger with adult. Its time to play outside! Drop by any time to give CNCs snowshoes a try, do a winter scavenger hunt or warm up by a campfire. Meet at the Homestead Cabin and come enjoy a winter morning in the snow. http://www.chippewanaturecenter.org

Monday, Jan. 25

Evening Snowshoe Hike is set for 5 to 6:30 p.m. at the Chippewa Nature Center in Midland. Come discover the beauty of a winter night! We will look for signs of animals, study tree silhouettes and enjoy the winter sky. Bring a headlamp or flashlight. Ages 15 and older; younger than 18 with adult. Reserve snowshoes online or call 989-631-0830. Registration required. http://www.chippewanaturecenter.org

Wednesday, Jan. 27

Evening Snowshoe Hike is set for 5 to 6:30 p.m. at the Chippewa Nature Center in Midland. Come discover the beauty of a winter night! We will look for signs of animals, study tree silhouettes and enjoy the winter sky. Bring a headlamp or flashlight. Ages 15 and older; younger than 18 with adult. Reserve snowshoes online or call 989-631-0830. Registration required. http://www.chippewanaturecenter.org

Thursday, Jan. 28

Full Moon Stroll is set for 5 to 6 p.m. at the Chippewa Nature Center in Midland. This months Wolf moon recognizes the shorter days and longer nights that occur near the winter solstice. Bundle up to look and listen for nocturnal wildlife moving under the moon light. Wear dark clothing and bring a flashlight. http://www.chippewanaturecenter.org. Free, ages 9-plus; younger than 18 with adult. Register by Jan. 27

Saturday, Jan. 29

A virtual Evening of Music and Conversation with Jeff Daniels is set for 7:30 p.m. Daniels, award-winning actor, musician and playwright, brings an intimate virtual concert experience to the Midland community as part of the Virtual Pass at Midland Center for the Arts. Tickets are on sale now by subscribing for the Virtual Pass at just $9.99/month at midlandcenter.org or by calling the center ticket office at 989-631-8250. Families subscribed for the Virtual Pass will have access to this virtual event along with many others.

Jan. 29-31

Zehnder's Snowfest: Join us for Zehnders Snowfest (limited event) . Although Snowfest will be different this year, visitors may still enjoy a limited number of larger-than-life snow sculptures and beautifully detailed ice carvings.Due to COVID-19 restrictions, this years event will not include entertainment, warming tent or fireworks but we encourage guests to view the snow and ice sculptures throughout downtown Frankenmuth.

Saturday, Jan. 30

Come Meet the Makers, an event to showcase and support local makers and growers, is set for 7:30 a.m. to noon at Live Oak Coffeehouse, 711 Ashman St. Midland. There will be two to eight vendors every Saturday through April, picking up where the Midland Farmer's Market left off and takes a break for the season. All vendors and patrons will adhere to current mask and social distancing guidelines, and hosts will limit traffic and gathering in common areas, provide opportunities for sanitizing. Interested in being a vendor? Sign up on the following form to inquire about being added to the schedule: http://bit.ly/MeettheMakers2020

Winter Tree Identification is set for 1 to 2 p.m. at Chippewa Nature Center in Midland. Learn to identify trees in winter by their bark, branches and buds. Compare characteristics of opposite, alternate or whorled, then look closer at bud shape and color. Dress for the weather for this outdoor program. Free for people ages 9 and older; 18 and younger with adult. Free. http://www.chippewanaturecenter.org

Tuesday, Feb. 2

Evening Snowshoe Hike is set for 5 to 6:30 p.m. at the Chippewa Nature Center in Midland. Come discover the beauty of a winter night! We will look for signs of animals, study tree silhouettes and enjoy the winter sky. Bring a headlamp or flashlight. Ages 15 and older; younger than 18 with adult. Reserve snowshoes online or call 989-631-0830. Registration required. http://www.chippewanaturecenter.org

Thursday, Feb. 4

Evening Snowshoe Hike is set for 5 to 6:30 p.m. at the Chippewa Nature Center in Midland. Come discover the beauty of a winter night! We will look for signs of animals, study tree silhouettes and enjoy the winter sky. Bring a headlamp or flashlight. Ages 15 and older; younger than 18 with adult. Reserve snowshoes online or call 989-631-0830. Registration required. http://www.chippewanaturecenter.org

Saturday, Feb. 6

Snowshoe Sampler is set for 2-4 p.m. at Chippewa Nature Center in Midland. Free for all ages, 18 and younger with adult. Its time to play outside! Drop by any time to give CNCs snowshoes a try, do a winter scavenger hunt or warm up by a campfire. Meet at the Homestead Cabin and come enjoy a winter morning in the snow. http://www.chippewanaturecenter.org

Feb. 6-7

A Winter Festival is set for 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Midland Center for the Arts. Join Midland Center for the Arts for a one-way exploration through the building with festive art, science and history activities for people of all ages. Shop local in our artisan village and experience the artwork of famous artists Norman Rockwell, Grandma Moses, and more in the Center's lobby gallery. Bring your entire family for kids activities to explore 1800's cold weather traditions and winter fun from around the world plus a colorful light display featuring an ice princess. Families looking to get a photo with their loved ones can choose between a variety of winter scenes, decorated by the Midland County Historical Society's volunteers from the Bradley Home. Tickets are $7 per person and free for museum members. Purchase tickets online at midlandcenter.org or by calling the box office at 989-631-5930.

Monday, Feb. 8

Evening Snowshoe Hike is set for 5 to 6:30 p.m. at the Chippewa Nature Center in Midland. Come discover the beauty of a winter night! We will look for signs of animals, study tree silhouettes and enjoy the winter sky. Bring a headlamp or flashlight. Ages 15 and older; younger than 18 with adult. Reserve snowshoes online or call 989-631-0830. Registration required. http://www.chippewanaturecenter.org

Wednesday, Feb. 10

Family Snowshoe Hike is set for 4 to 5:30 p.m. at the Chippewa Nature Center in Midland. Event is for ages 5 and older with adult. Reserve snowshoes online or call 989-631-0830. Registration required. Bring the whole family for an afternoon of exploration on snowshoes - no experience needed! We will search high and low for signs of animals as we explore on and off trails. Please bring a sled to pull younger children. http://www.chippewanaturecenter.org

Thursday, Feb. 11

Citizen Science: Wood Duck Box Clean Out is set for 3-5 p.m. for kids 9 and older with an adult at Chippewa Nature Center. Registration required. Join Tom Lennon, director of Land Facilities, as we monitor wood duck boxes, counting the number of hatched eggs from last season and seeing if anyone has been using the boxes since then. Meet at the end of the Homestead Road by the pavilion and dress to be outdoors for the entire program.

Saturday, Feb. 13

I <3 Science is set for 2 p.m. Celebrate Valentines Day early with the Alden B. Dow Museum of Science & Art as we learn about heart health, amazing innovations in medical technology, and well-being science. Join the center virtually for special health talks, a hands-on heart activity, and even a virtual dance lesson. Supply kits for the hands-on activity are included in your registration cost of $7 or $5 for Museum Members. Sales will close on Sunday, Feb. 7 at noon. Purchase tickets online at midlandcenter.org or by calling the box office at 989-631-5930.

Snowshoe Sampler is set for 10 a.m. to noon at Chippewa Nature Center in Midland. Free for all ages, 18 and younger with adult. Its time to play outside! Drop by any time to give CNCs snowshoes a try, do a winter scavenger hunt or warm up by a campfire. Meet at the Homestead Cabin and come enjoy a winter morning in the snow.

Families in Nature: Winter Shelters is scheduled for 2-3 p.m. at Chippewa Nature Center for all ages. Registration required. Winter survival hangs in the balance as animals prepare their shelters for the harsh weather. Join a CNC naturalist to seek out, talk about and create winter shelters to determine if you would survive the season.

Tuesday, Feb. 16

Evening Snowshoe Hike is set for 5 to 6:30 p.m. at the Chippewa Nature Center in Midland. Come discover the beauty of a winter night! We will look for signs of animals, study tree silhouettes and enjoy the winter sky. Bring a headlamp or flashlight. Ages 15 and older; younger than 18 with adult. Reserve snowshoes online or call 989-631-0830. Registration required. http://www.chippewanaturecenter.org

Thursday, Feb. 18

Adventures for Women: Snowshoe Hike is set for 5-6:30 p.m. for ages 15 and up at Chippewa Nature Center. Reserve snowshoes online or call 989.631.0830. Pre-registration required. Enjoy an afternoon hike on snowshoes as we notice birds, animal tracks and other points of interest in the woods and fields. Beginner and experienced snowshoers are welcome. http://www.chippewanaturecenter.org

Sunday, Feb. 21

Wigwam in the Winter is set for 2-4 p.m. at Chippewa Nature Center for all ages. Drop by the wigwam to get a glimpse into what it was like for Ojibwa Indians to live in a wigwam along the Pine River several hundred years ago. You'll have a chance to see some traditional tools used for hunting and preparing wild game, learn about the fur trade and see some plants used for making cordage and baskets. If there is enough snow, there will be a game of snow snakes outside.

Monday, Feb. 22

Evening Snowshoe Hike is set for 5 to 6:30 p.m. at the Chippewa Nature Center in Midland. Come discover the beauty of a winter night! We will look for signs of animals, study tree silhouettes and enjoy the winter sky. Bring a headlamp or flashlight. Ages 15 and older; younger than 18 with adult. Reserve snowshoes online or call 989-631-0830. Registration required. http://www.chippewanaturecenter.org

Tuesday, Feb. 23

Reimagining Dinosaurs with National Geographic LIVE is set for 7 p.m. Join MATRIX:MIDLAND as part of Midland Center for the Arts Virtual Pass to Reimagine Dinosaurs with National Geographic Live. Groundbreaking new science is changing what we thought we knew about how dinosaurs looked, moved, and lived. New-found troves from the Moroccan desert suggest that the immense predator Spinosaurus spent much of its time in the water. And in Chile, scientists have discovered a shocking new therapod. Unlike its cousins, Velociraptor and T. rex, Chilesaurus consumed a vegetarian diet. Join leading paleontologists Nizar Ibrahim and Sebastin Rozadilla for stories and conversation about the evolving science of dinosaurs. This event is included with a subscription to Midland Centers Virtual Pass at just $9.99/month. Purchase online at midlandcenter.org or by calling the box office at 989-631-5930.

Wednesday, Feb. 24

Evening Snowshoe Hike is set for 5 to 6:30 p.m. at the Chippewa Nature Center in Midland. Come discover the beauty of a winter night! We will look for signs of animals, study tree silhouettes and enjoy the winter sky. Bring a headlamp or flashlight. Ages 15 and older; younger than 18 with adult. Reserve snowshoes online or call 989-631-0830. Registration required. http://www.chippewanaturecenter.org

Thursday, Feb. 25

Owl Prowl is set for 7-8 p.m. at Chippewa Nature Center for ages 9 and up. Join Interpretive Naturalist Michelle Fournier for an adventure into the nighttime world of owls. We will travel to different "owl hotspots" on CNC property via (participants will have to drive themselves) and take some short hikes as we try to call an owl in for a closer look. Pre-registration is required and make sure to dress for the weather for this outdoor program.

Saturday, Feb. 27

Full Moon Stroll is set for 6:30 to 8 p.m. for ages 9 and up. Enjoy a crisp winter walk under the light of the Snow Moon. We will look for signs of animals and enjoy the beauty of the woods after dark. Wear dark clothing and bring a flashlight.

As Michigan begins to open up and events are being organized, the Daily News is resuming its popular What's Happening column, your guide to local entertainment-type events in the Great Lakes Bay region. If you have an event you would like included, please email the information to Managing Editor Lori Qualls at lqualls@mdn.net

For the health and safety of others, social distancing and face coverings are recommended and required in some cases.

Go here to see the original:
Things to Do: Entertainment in the Midland, Great Lakes Bay region - Midland Daily News

Millions of Britons to become vegetarian for the planet and to get likes on Instagram – Express

Jan, 8th 2021 2:50 pm, Article Recommended by Dr. J. Smith

Londoners are embracing plant-based food more than any other region (46 percent), followed by those in the west midlands (34 percent) and the southwest (32 percent). But while four in 10 have the environment at the forefront of their mind, others are more concerned about their social media profiles (13 percent).

One in five want to be seen to be doing their part in Veganuary, while 45 percent simply dont feel the need to eat meat every single day.

Almost four in 10 (39 percent) also acknowledged there are now good meat free options available.

The average adult reckons more than a quarter of their meals in January will be meat-free equating to more than 1.2 billion meals across the UK with this month likely to see more vegetarian meals eaten than at any other time of the year.

And those aged 18-34 will eat the least meat.

It also emerged 28 percent of adults will deliberately decrease their meat intake this year, but 69 percent said they love meat too much to give it up full time.

A spokesman from Rustlers, which commissioned the research following the launch of its Moroccan vegetarian burger, said: In recent years weve embraced new lifestyles and adopted different attitudes towards diet, with reducing our meat intake firmly on the agenda.

Of course, you do not have to give up meat to enjoy a vegetarian snack or meal, and it seems as though more people identifying as flexitarian is likely in 2021.

January is always a popular time to try reducing our meat, with a number of people likely to be taking on Veganuary or trying to use the new year as a time to try something new.

The study also found that this time next year, 31 percent would hope to consider themselves a flexitarian, with 38 percent believing they are more likely to go flexitarian than ever before.

More than half of those polled said they thought vegetarian meat alternatives taste a lot better now than they used to, with meat-free burgers, sausages and mince the most popular.

It also emerged that dinner is a more common meal to experiment with than lunch.

Food psychologist, Greg Tucker, said: January is a new start and people feel more motivated to try something different usually for themselves and for the world around them.

Ultimately it is this virtuous circle doing good and feeling good that keeps us motivated because we get a positive emotional outcome.

Like the research results suggest, more people are now making the switch to a flexitarian diet and cutting down on their meat intake, which is more environmentally friendly its no longer Doing Without but Doing Better.

A spokesman from Rustlers, added: We wanted to create a delicious and exciting vegetarian burger that doesnt lack on taste by exploring world flavours while still being convenient and without compromising on enjoyment.

Whatever your reasons for trying more vegetarian products this year, there are certainly more delicious products out there than ever before so its a great time to experiment.

Food psychologists tips on being flexitarian:

1. Select products that boast exciting spice blends and flavours for more enjoyment.

2. Alternate vegetarian and meat days, or simply start with a couple of vegetarian days a week so you dont feel like youre missing out.

3. Roasting vegetables makes it taste more exciting while retaining nutrients.

4. Keep things varied eat a bigger range of vegetables to keep the interest up.

5. Make sure youre eating the rainbow make sure your plate of food is a range of bright colours.

6. Texture matters make sure that variety includes different textures such as soft tomatoes and crunchy carrots.

7. Dont obsess with it being a meal made of vegetables focus on creating a really flavoursome dish using seasoning, herbs and different cooking techniques.

8. Start slowly and pick something vegetarian that you associate with your favourite meal e.g. a burger except with a falafel patty, or a vegetable-topped pizza.

9. Make a vegetarian meal more of an event incorporate exciting sauces such gochujang, wasabi, chutneys, or kimchi to fire up the taste buds.

10. Make sure your vegetarian main includes a delicious side like homemade chips.

The rest is here:
Millions of Britons to become vegetarian for the planet and to get likes on Instagram - Express

Weight loss: Is it healthy to lose weight fast? | The Times of India – Times of India

Jan, 8th 2021 2:49 pm, Article Recommended by Dr. J. Smith

Slow weight loss may not sound that appealing to you, but it is the best option. You can certainly boost your weight loss process by following some simple tricks like:

Staying hydrated: Sufficient amount of water intake is important for your body to function properly and shed kilos. It prevents you from overeating, unhealthy munching and boosts your metabolism.

Having a balanced diet: Most people when trying to shed kilo only focus on their protein intake. For weight loss carbs and fat are equally important.

Drinking herbal tea: Green tea or herbal tea have known to boost weight loss. So it is recommended to add them to your diet. Swap your regular cup of coffee and tea with these health-friendly options.

Strength training: Strength training exercises help you burn calories at rest and even build muscles. At least twice in a week perform strength training exercises in your routine.

Continue reading here:
Weight loss: Is it healthy to lose weight fast? | The Times of India - Times of India

Weight-loss plan developed at Penn State named one of the nation’s best – Penn State News

Jan, 8th 2021 2:49 pm, Article Recommended by Dr. J. Smith

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. Restaurant closures, supply chain disruptions, and employment changes have altered peoples eating habits to varying degrees this year. Research shows that people have had a hard time maintaining their weight. People who are looking to lose weight may want to consider Volumetrics, a diet developed by Penn State Nutrition Professor Barbara Rolls.

For each of the last 11 years, Volumetrics has shown up near the top of the U.S. News & World Reports annual rankings of the best available diets. This year, Volumetricstied for the ranking ofNo. 3 "Best Weight-Loss Plan," while also appearing on the lists for "Best Overall Diets," "Best Fast Weight-Loss Diets," "Easiest Diets to Follow," "Best Diets for Healthy Eating," and "Best Diets for Diabetes."

How Volumetrics works

According to Rolls, Volumetrics is a research-based diet that focuses on satiety, or feeling satisfied after eating. In Volumetrics, people are shown how to lower the calorie-density of their diet. Calorie density refers to the amount of energy, in the form of calories, that is contained in a volume of food.

Volumetrics doesnt ban any particular foods, Rolls said. Its just that, as the calorie density goes up, you are encouraged to eat those foods in more moderate amounts.

When low calorie-density foods like fruits and vegetables are substituted for higher-calorie density foods, people can eat their usual portions while managing calories. This enables people to feel full and satisfied while losing weight. Volumetrics encourages people to eat a good balance of nutrients while comfortably controlling their hunger.

Rolls, Helen A. Guthrie Chair in Nutritional Sciences, has conducted a number of studies demonstrating that following Volumetrics leads to successful weight loss.

In our research, people who ate a lower calorie-density diet were consuming between one to two pounds more food each day compared to people who were not reducing calorie density, Rolls explained. Over six months, the people on the reduced calorie-density diet ate fewer calories and lost significantly more weight.

Other studies have shown that people who ate a low calorie-density diet for a year ate more food and felt less hungry.

Rolls has written three books about Volumetrics. The "Volumetrics Weight Control Plan," published in 2000, explores the science of satiety. "The Volumetrics Eating Plan," published in 2005, focuses on practical dietary advice. 2012s "The Ultimate Volumetrics Diet contains a 12-week diet plan.

What to eat

This is not about eating nothing but salads, said Rolls. Its about substituting some lower calorie-density ingredients into your meals without sacrificing the flavor. So, in your favorite sandwich, put a bit less of the fatty meat and bulk it up with your favorite vegetables. Perhaps use mustard instead of mayonnaise.

We have shown that the calorie density in dishes like macaroni and cheese can be reduced by 20% to 30% without anyone noticing, Rolls continued. When you do this, people eat the same amount they would have of higher calorie-density macaroni and cheese. They do not feel hungrier after the meal, and they do not compensate at the next meal. Even three-to-five-year-old kids who of course are not trying to lose weight but who are eating to feel satisfied who ate this way for five days didnt compensate by consuming additional food.

The magic weight-loss ingredient

Rolls said that people often ask her if there is one ingredient that can help them lose weight, and there is: water. Water adds bulk to food and contains no calories at all.

Rolls also emphasizes that weight loss and healthy eating must be connected. Ultimately she wants to help people find a healthy eating pattern that they enjoy that will help with sustainable weight management.

A lot of people think of managing weight and healthy eating as two different things. Volumetrics brings these together and emphasizes that, when people are eating fewer calories, it is more important than ever to eat a good balance of nutrients, Rolls said. One of my goals is to make sure that the concepts in Volumetrics become part of mainstream thinking about weight loss.

About the rankings

To rank diets, U.S. News & World Report assembles a panel of experts in diet, nutrition, obesity, food psychology, diabetes and heart disease to rank diets by seven standards: ease to follow, short-term weight loss, long-term weight loss, nutritional completeness, safety, managing heart health, and managing diabetes.

Volumetrics was ranked No. 5 (tie) for best diets overall, No. 7 for best fast weight-loss diets, No. 8 for easiest diets to follow, No. 7 (tie) for best diets for diabetes, and No. 5 (tie) for best diets for healthy eating.

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Weight-loss plan developed at Penn State named one of the nation's best - Penn State News