Diet & Nutrition : National Multiple Sclerosis Society

Oct, 20th 2019 8:43 am, Article Recommended by Dr. J. Smith

Overview

Maintenance of general good health is very important for people with any chronic disorder: a well-balanced and planned diet will help achieve this goal. Although there's no special MS diet, what and how you eat can make a difference in your energy level, bladder and bowel function, and overall health. MS specialists recommend that people with MS adhere to the same low-fat, high-fiber diet recommendations of the American Heart Association and the American Cancer Society for the general population. The USDA's MyPlate website can help you start on the path to healthy nutrition. Learn more about the importance of nutrition in MS.

Most claims made for dietary treatments are based on personal accounts, and reported benefits may be changes that could have happened without any treatment. Read more in Eating Habitsarticle from Momentum magazine and below:

In spring of 2015, an abstract was published of preliminary results from a clinical trial in France involving 154 people with primary-progressive MS or secondary-progressive MS. They were given high-dose biotin (MD1003) or inactive placebo for 48 weeks. The results suggested that 12.6% of those given MD1003 showed improvement in disability (using either the EDSS scale that measures disability progression, or improvement in a timed walk), versus none of those on placebo, and there were no serious safety issues reported.

More research is needed to determine who might benefit from this approach. MedDay Pharma, which sponsored the trial, stated that another trial is underway.

NOTE:In November, 2017, the FDA issued a Safety Alertto let the public and healthcare providers know that biotin can significantly interfere with certain lab tests, causing falsely high or falsely low test results that may go undetected. Talk to your doctor if you are currently taking biotin or are considering adding biotin, or a supplement containing biotin, to your diet. Biotin is found in multivitamins, including prenatal vitamins, biotin supplements and dietary supplements for hair, skin, and nail growth. Withholding biotin is often necessary before certain blood tests are done to avoid falsely abnormal results.It is important to speak with the healthcare provider who is ordering the blood tests for specific withholding instructions. The FDA isrequesting information about any adverse events or side effects you may experience related to the use of biotin or products containing biotin.

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Diet & Nutrition : National Multiple Sclerosis Society